VNZ in the News

VNZ Releases InvolveMe to Increase the Effectiveness of Volunteering

Volunteering New Zealand is pleased to release ‘InvolveMe’ a free online tool designed to help strengthen the effort of our nation’s 1.2 million volunteers.

“New Zealand’s volunteer workforce generates the equivalent of $3.5 billion to the economy, across more than 100,000 non-profit organisations, so it is vital that we ensure people with responsibility for volunteering across all levels of an organisation remain agile and strategic in the face of changing forms and expectations of volunteers” says Scott Miller, Chief Executive of Volunteering New Zealand.

The InvolveMe tool comprises a survey and customised report for organisational staff and volunteers to assess their organisation’s existing strengths and opportunities by providing an almost 360 degree picture of the organisation’s effectiveness across four domains: (1) strategy, (2) organisation culture, (3) communication, and (4) tools, processes, and resources supporting volunteering.

Miller explains that the tool will help people to “look at their strengths and weaknesses, and to start a conversation about what work can be done to support and improve the volunteer experience. By identifying any gaps and generating ideas for addressing these, we think it will be ideal to use when reviewing or refreshing your organisation’s volunteer involvement.”

The development of the tool has been gratefully funded through the 2016 Department of Internal Affairs’ Community Leadership Fund.
Improve the effectiveness of your volunteering experience by trying the InvolveMe tool for yourself at www.involveme.nz

National Volunteer Week – VNZ in the news

Here are some of the articles that the VNZ team have written or been quoted in for National Volunteer Week 2017:

  • How to find time to be a volunteer [AUCKLAND NOW] – http://www.stuff.co.nz/auckland/local-news/93413814/how-to-find-time-to-be-a-volunteer [Author, Dave Adams]
  • Dave Adams: 7 reasons you should become a volunteer [Dominion Post, Opinion page] http://www.stuff.co.nz/dominion-post/comment/93732112/dave-adams-7-reasons-you-should-become-a-volunteer
  • Retired couple find meaning through mentoring children [Over60 online] http://www.oversixty.co.nz/lifestyle/retirement-life/2017/06/retired-couple-find-meaning-through-mentoring-children/ [Author, Dave Adams]
  • NZ Football and its volunteers 
    Wendy Rapana

    Why a National Qualification for Managers of Volunteers is the next big thing…

    It is my view that given the natural alignment between the Competencies and current qualifications in leadership and management on the NZ Qualifications Framework, a formal qualification for managers of volunteers is on its way.

    – –

    I’m new to Volunteering NZ as a Board member, but I’ve been a volunteer all my life depending on what my focus was at any given time.  My grandmother was an advocate of Red Cross so I’d collect money once a year at their annual fundraisers.  When I became a mother, I supported Plunket and when the kids went to school I became staunchly supportive of Whanau Support Groups to try and raise money for the very basics required and assist where and how I could.

    Currently, one of my paid jobs is that of a workplace assessor, mainly in the area of business, administration, management, Maori, etc., working with a number of Industry Training Organisations. Therefore, I am really excited to be working on behalf of VNZ with Careerforce ITO to investigate a national qualification for Managers of Volunteers.

    A Learning and Development Pathway for managers of volunteers

    Managing staff is a big deal, and often requires a different set of skills, a lot of patience and a belief in oneself.  It can be frustrating but is also one of the most rewarding roles that I’ve had over the years.

    Since late 2009 VNZ have spent time and money developing a body of work dedicated to the support and development of Managers of Volunteers.  The focus of this work has been to make explicit the often-invisible role of managers of volunteers, and promote the importance of what they do to make volunteering happen effectively.

    For a development pathway to work as it should, managers of volunteers needed to be able to see their progress along a sliding scale.  As a result, the Competencies for Managers of Volunteers was developed.

    “A competency includes all the skills, knowledge and attributes and values needed to do something.  Competence does not exist as something that can be learnt in isolation; it is demonstrated in the performance of a task.”[1]

    Turning the Competencies into a National Qualification

    There are New Zealand qualifications developed for management roles in six vocational pathways that provide a generic approach to management skills whatever industry you are in, including managing volunteers.  Depending on the level of skill you aspire to, will depend on the level of that qualification from levels 3 to 6.

    Therefore, it is my view that given the natural alignment between the Competencies and current qualifications in leadership and management on the NZ Qualifications Framework, a formal qualification for managers of volunteers is on its way. When it does, managers of volunteers – it will be your time to shine.

     

    Wendy Rapana

    Wendy Rapana, Board Member – Maori

    [1] Ministry of Education, 2005. Key competencies in Tertiary Education: Developing a New Zealand Framework. A Discussion Document. Ministry of Education, Wellington.

     http://www.volunteeringnz.org.nz/2017/06/nzf/ [Author, Hely Kim]
  • Lights, camera — just try it!
    Wendy Rapana

    Why a National Qualification for Managers of Volunteers is the next big thing…

    It is my view that given the natural alignment between the Competencies and current qualifications in leadership and management on the NZ Qualifications Framework, a formal qualification for managers of volunteers is on its way.

    – –

    I’m new to Volunteering NZ as a Board member, but I’ve been a volunteer all my life depending on what my focus was at any given time.  My grandmother was an advocate of Red Cross so I’d collect money once a year at their annual fundraisers.  When I became a mother, I supported Plunket and when the kids went to school I became staunchly supportive of Whanau Support Groups to try and raise money for the very basics required and assist where and how I could.

    Currently, one of my paid jobs is that of a workplace assessor, mainly in the area of business, administration, management, Maori, etc., working with a number of Industry Training Organisations. Therefore, I am really excited to be working on behalf of VNZ with Careerforce ITO to investigate a national qualification for Managers of Volunteers.

    A Learning and Development Pathway for managers of volunteers

    Managing staff is a big deal, and often requires a different set of skills, a lot of patience and a belief in oneself.  It can be frustrating but is also one of the most rewarding roles that I’ve had over the years.

    Since late 2009 VNZ have spent time and money developing a body of work dedicated to the support and development of Managers of Volunteers.  The focus of this work has been to make explicit the often-invisible role of managers of volunteers, and promote the importance of what they do to make volunteering happen effectively.

    For a development pathway to work as it should, managers of volunteers needed to be able to see their progress along a sliding scale.  As a result, the Competencies for Managers of Volunteers was developed.

    “A competency includes all the skills, knowledge and attributes and values needed to do something.  Competence does not exist as something that can be learnt in isolation; it is demonstrated in the performance of a task.”[1]

    Turning the Competencies into a National Qualification

    There are New Zealand qualifications developed for management roles in six vocational pathways that provide a generic approach to management skills whatever industry you are in, including managing volunteers.  Depending on the level of skill you aspire to, will depend on the level of that qualification from levels 3 to 6.

    Therefore, it is my view that given the natural alignment between the Competencies and current qualifications in leadership and management on the NZ Qualifications Framework, a formal qualification for managers of volunteers is on its way. When it does, managers of volunteers – it will be your time to shine.

     

    Wendy Rapana

    Wendy Rapana, Board Member – Maori

    [1] Ministry of Education, 2005. Key competencies in Tertiary Education: Developing a New Zealand Framework. A Discussion Document. Ministry of Education, Wellington.

    http://www.volunteeringnz.org.nz/2017/06/lights-camera/ [Author, Laura Allen]
  • Media Release: Our Week to Recognise our 1.2 Million Volunteer Workforce http://www.scoop.co.nz/stories/AK1706/S00394/our-week-to-recognise-our-12-million-volunteer-workforce.htm
  • Volunteering Best Practice [dogoodjobs.co.nz] http://dogoodjobs.co.nz/guest-post-volunteering-best-practice/ [Author, Laura Allen]

© Copyright 2015 Volunteering New Zealand Incorporated