News

VNZ marks International Day of Democracy (15 September 2017)

New Zealanders are facing an exciting month, as 2017 General Election is drawing near. While the excitement for the upcoming election continues to rise, International Day of Democracy on 15 September is sure to give us a welcome opportunity to reflect on the wider value of our democratic society. The theme for this year’s International Day of Democracy is peace and stability.

As the UN envisions it, a truly democratic society is not only a system that allows each person to cast a single ballot, but also a space where all individuals have a chance to make their voices count. This month, New Zealand has a unique opportunity to strive towards an inclusive society built on accountable institutions at all levels – a society where everyone is valued, disputes are settled without violence, and vulnerable groups have access to appropriate support. Voters have known to experience both excitement and frustration after the election. However, at this critical moment, we must remember that voting is not the only way to express our opinions. It is certainly the most important process in any democratic society, but other channels of actions are also available.

Volunteering is a good way to directly impact the community around us. First and foremost, volunteering is a democratic action that sustains an inclusive, fair society from the smallest level. Each volunteer’s action sends ripples through the society by making hidden issues visible and looking after the well-being of their local communities. In fact, even the government agencies may find their resources overstretched, if it weren’t for the contribution of countless volunteers across the nation. According to the data published on Stats.NZ, NGOs contributed $9.4 billion to New Zealand’s GDP in 2012 alone, which includes $3.5 billion generated by the labour of volunteers alone. Stats NZ also observes that the value of volunteering has been on the rise since 2004. Despite the reduction in the total hours of contribution, the loss has been made up by the increasing number of passionate volunteers who seek to change the world through their action.

In the truest democratic fashion, NGOs across New Zealand are directly involved in shaping a better future. Shakti is one of those organisations. Run on the dedication of strong-willed volunteers, Shakti aids the migrant women and children who suffer from the lack of cultural understanding and language barrier, which leaves them defenceless against the domestic violence. Shakti New Zealand has been established in 1995. Since its inception, Shakti’s key strength has always been the advocates in the small regional offices who mobilised limited resources to cover crises lines, education of the general public, workshops, the welfare and safety of migrant women and children. Regardless of where one stands – in solidarity, by the helpline, with a stack of necessary forms, for a moment of silence – each volunteer paved the way towards the legislation against forced marriage in 2016. As Justice Minister Amy Adams noted, the legislative ban sends a clear message that our society refuses to accept such forms of violence.

On 15 September, Volunteering New Zealand would like to recognise all the organisations and volunteer on the forefront of democratic change. Their combined efforts add maturity of our community. In the truest sense, they are the actors who still speak loud without words.

If you are searching a suitable opportunity to get involved, visit our website for helpful resources. In Mahatma Gandhi’s famous words: “Be the change you wish to see in the world.”

Volunteering New Zealand (VNZ) is an association of national volunteer-involving organisations that have a commitment to volunteering. Their mission is to maximise the impact of volunteering in our communities.

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Political Parties Respond to Volunteering NZ

This post was originally posted on scoop.co.nz.

Volunteering, like voting, is an opportunity to exercise our democratic citizenship.

Contributing 157 million hours or the equivalent of approximately $3.5 billion to the country’s GDP, volunteers are vital to the social development, economy and environment of New Zealanders.

VNZ are therefore pleased to publish the responses from nearly every political party in relation to our 2017 election manifesto for volunteers and volunteering. ‘There are many changes occurring within the volunteering sector making it essential it remains well supported and future-proofed’ states Scott Miller, Chief Executive of Volunteering New Zealand.

‘The 2017 election provides an opportunity to look at how the Government can ensure volunteering remains a strong part of our nation’s identity, and the level to which this is reflected in parties’ policy manifestos and replies’ adds Miller.

Following consultation with its members, Volunteering New Zealand’s manifesto contains four areas of focus for the next Government. These are: (1) Government agencies better valuing and recognising the contribution made by volunteers to service delivery and social capital; (2) Making it easier for people to volunteer; (3) Support for more effective volunteer management; and (4) Looking after the welfare of volunteer workers.

Read the VNZ manifesto and the party responses at www.volunteeringnz.org.nz/policy/elections/

Volunteering New Zealand (VNZ) is an association of national volunteer-involving organisations that have a commitment to volunteering. Their mission is to maximise the impact of volunteering in our communities. www.volunteeringnz.org.nz

[ends]

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Political Parties Respond to Volunteering NZ

Volunteering, like voting, is an opportunity to exercise our democratic citizenship.

Contributing 157 million hours or the equivalent of approximately $3.5 billion to the country’s GDP, volunteers are vital to the social development, economy and environment of New Zealanders.

VNZ are therefore pleased to publish the responses from nearly every political party in relation to our 2017 election manifesto for volunteers and volunteering. ‘There are many changes occurring within the volunteering sector making it essential it remains well supported and future-proofed’ states Scott Miller, Chief Executive of Volunteering New Zealand.

‘The 2017 election provides an opportunity to look at how the Government can ensure volunteering remains a strong part of our nation’s identity, and the level to which this is reflected in parties’ policy manifestos and replies’ adds Miller.

Following consultation with its members, Volunteering New Zealand’s manifesto contains four areas of focus for the next Government. These are: (1) Government agencies better valuing and recognising the contribution made by volunteers to service delivery and social capital; (2) Making it easier for people to volunteer; (3) Support for more effective volunteer management; and (4) Looking after the welfare of volunteer workers.

Read the VNZ manifesto and the party responses at www.volunteeringnz.org.nz/policy/elections/

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August Newsletter

Read the latest sector news in our August newsletter including:

  • New speakers announced for VNZ National Conference.
  • A report on engaging female volunteers in sports organisations
  • NZ research on the voice of volunteers’ families at Fire and Emergency NZ
  • Confirmation that volunteering will be retained in the next Census
  • Four new blog posts from Doris Cuttell (AFS), Brayden Smith (VNZ), Steve Caldwell (LandSAR), and Sue Hine (VNZ)
  • And responses from the Maori Party and United Future on our election Manifesto.

Find the August newsletter here.

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July Newsletter

Read the latest sector news in our July newsletter including:

  • New speakers announced for VNZ National Conference.
  • VNZ release our 2017 General Election Manifesto
  • Reports from Volunteer Ireland, IAVE and NPC
  • Four new blog posts from David Irving, Wendy Rapana, Jamie Milne, and Scott Miller.

Find the July newsletter here.

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Leadership is often confused with management

Management is a skill that allows you to get others to do what you want them to do. In general terms it’s usually done by instruction: ‘I want you to achieve X’.

Leadership is a talent that creates a team environment within which the entire organisation is inspired by what needs to be done and is passionate about doing it. In this scenario instruction is dropped in favour of motivation: ‘We’re going to achieve X; now let’s agree how and what your part will be’. In my experience, this approach achieves better results than management.

Fundraising leadership

When you consider charities and their fundraising activities, it is essential that the senior team shows leadership qualities. You cannot consider yourself a leader if you set your fundraising manager a target and simply tell them to get on with it. If a charity needs to raise funds to support its cause, then everybody in the organisation needs to be a ‘fundraiser’ and leadership must come from the top.

Sit down with your fundraising manager and find out what they need you to do to make your fundraising activities more effective. That may involve visiting prospective major donors, fronting presentations, or accompanying the fundraising team on promotional visits. Whatever it requires, you are responsible for demonstrating leadership qualities.

Leading by example

Are you a CEO or senior manager of a charity?  Do you make donations to your own organisation? You should! How can you ask other people to do what you are not prepared to do yourself?  It’s a much easier conversation to have with a friend or business acquaintance to say; ‘Have you thought of making a regular monthly donation? I do, it’s quite rewarding’.  Once again, leading by example.

Leading with enthusiasm

In all of these cases, it is essential that you participate with enthusiasm; any reluctance will soon be identified as paying lip-service. It is equally important whether you have full-time professional fundraisers, part-time, casual or volunteer staff. In fact, the closer you get to the volunteer end of the spectrum, the more important it is to show leadership qualities. If you simply manage volunteers without inspiring them, they will probably find something more inspiring to donate their time to.

If you inspire people, they will probably amaze you with what they achieve. This requires leadership.

 

David Irving is the Chief Executive at Fundraising Institute of New Zealand

David has experience in senior management and governance; having held a number of senior roles, including CEO, and several directorships, particularly start-up companies. David has strong experience in developing high performance teams, in both commercial and not for profit sectors.

VNZ Releases InvolveMe to Increase the Effectiveness of Volunteering

Volunteering New Zealand is pleased to release ‘InvolveMe’ a free online tool designed to help strengthen the effort of our nation’s 1.2 million volunteers.

VNZ Releases InvolveMe

“New Zealand’s volunteer workforce generates the equivalent of $3.5 billion to the economy, across more than 100,000 non-profit organisations, so it is vital that we ensure people with responsibility for volunteering across all levels of an organisation remain agile and strategic in the face of changing forms and expectations of volunteers” says Scott Miller, Chief Executive of Volunteering New Zealand.

The InvolveMe tool comprises a survey and customised report for organisational staff and volunteers to assess their organisation’s existing strengths and opportunities by providing an almost 360 degree picture of the organisation’s effectiveness across four domains: (1) strategy, (2) organisation culture, (3) communication, and (4) tools, processes, and resources supporting volunteering.

Miller explains that the tool will help people to “look at their strengths and weaknesses, and to start a conversation about what work can be done to support and improve the volunteer experience. By identifying any gaps and generating ideas for addressing these, we think it will be ideal to use when reviewing or refreshing your organisation’s volunteer involvement.”

The development of the tool has been gratefully funded through the 2016 Department of Internal Affairs’ Community Leadership Fund.
Improve the effectiveness of your volunteering experience by trying the InvolveMe tool for yourself at www.involveme.nz

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National Volunteer Week – VNZ in the news

Here are some of the articles that the VNZ team have written or been quoted in for National Volunteer Week 2017:

  • How to find time to be a volunteer [AUCKLAND NOW] – http://www.stuff.co.nz/auckland/local-news/93413814/how-to-find-time-to-be-a-volunteer [Author, Dave Adams]
  • Dave Adams: 7 reasons you should become a volunteer [Dominion Post, Opinion page] http://www.stuff.co.nz/dominion-post/comment/93732112/dave-adams-7-reasons-you-should-become-a-volunteer
  • Retired couple find meaning through mentoring children [Over60 online] http://www.oversixty.co.nz/lifestyle/retirement-life/2017/06/retired-couple-find-meaning-through-mentoring-children/ [Author, Dave Adams]
  • NZ Football and its volunteers 

    Volunteering: From the Suffragist movement to election year voting

    September 19, 1893, marked a significant moment in the lives of New Zealand women. This day would indicate the beginning of a society in which women would be accepted a little bit more for their substance as a person, rather than their role as a wife or mother. Women such as Kate Sheppard may just be the epitome of what it is to volunteer for change that will be effective, and enduring.

    Through petitions and protests, the suffragists lifted the previously silent voices of New Zealand women. While it took decades for women to achieve their rights, and possibly not without the backing of powerful men, the suffragists fought to be one step closer in the struggle for equality. Today, thanks to the suffragist movement, we are in a position to push harder for such rights.

    While it may appear that we have made a lot of progress in 124 years, women of the 21st century continue to be somewhat “disenfranchised” in many ways. This is evident in the gender pay gap, women’s underrepresentation in government, domestic violence statistics, and the burden of domestic expectations, even for working women.

    However, women are in a better position today to make change, than in 1893. Volunteering offers opportunities to empower women in many ways, whether it be through campaigns, protests, educational tutoring, or supporting a local refuge, women everywhere still need the help of w

     

    This election year, we have a powerful opportunity to do just that. As we volunteer our time to participate in change for women, and for our country, we are reminded of the power such actions have. While change can often be slow, and may seem at times to take a step backwards, rather than succumbing to demoralization we can step up and make our vote count.  And lastly, let us be encouraged as to the impact our vote has. In the wise and courageous words of Kate Sheppard “Do not think you’re single vote does not mean much. The rain that refreshes the parched ground is made up of single drops”. Let us remember these words this election.

    – Kelly Redman

    Kelly is a Master’s student at the University of Waikato. Her focus is primarily on feminist issues such as inequality, and the consequences of sexist oppression. ”

    I wrote this article because I believe in the power that volunteering has in raising women’s voices, as well as the responsibility

    omen and men alike, to “take up the torch” and keep the suffragists movement active.

    we have to advocate for change. I am honoured to have been able to volunteer my time to VNZ, and to contribute to this cause. Nga manaakitanga.”

    News

    VNZ marks International Day of Democracy (15 September 2017)

    New Zealanders are facing an exciting month, as 2017 General Election is drawing near. While the excitement for the upcoming election continues to rise, International Day of Democracy on 15 September is sure to give us a welcome opportunity to reflect on the wider value of our democratic society. The theme for this year’s International Day of Democracy is peace and stability.

    As the UN envisions it, a truly democratic society is not only a system that allows each person to cast a single ballot, but also a space where all individuals have a chance to make their voices count. This month, New Zealand has a unique opportunity to strive towards an inclusive society built on accountable institutions at all levels – a society where everyone is valued, disputes are settled without violence, and vulnerable groups have access to appropriate support. Voters have known to experience both excitement and frustration after the election. However, at this critical moment, we must remember that voting is not the only way to express our opinions. It is certainly the most important process in any democratic society, but other channels of actions are also available.

    Volunteering is a good way to directly impact the community around us. First and foremost, volunteering is a democratic action that sustains an inclusive, fair society from the smallest level. Each volunteer’s action sends ripples through the society by making hidden issues visible and looking after the well-being of their local communities. In fact, even the government agencies may find their resources overstretched, if it weren’t for the contribution of countless volunteers across the nation. According to the data published on Stats.NZ, NGOs contributed $9.4 billion to New Zealand’s GDP in 2012 alone, which includes $3.5 billion generated by the labour of volunteers alone. Stats NZ also observes that the value of volunteering has been on the rise since 2004. Despite the reduction in the total hours of contribution, the loss has been made up by the increasing number of passionate volunteers who seek to change the world through their action.

    In the truest democratic fashion, NGOs across New Zealand are directly involved in shaping a better future. Shakti is one of those organisations. Run on the dedication of strong-willed volunteers, Shakti aids the migrant women and children who suffer from the lack of cultural understanding and language barrier, which leaves them defenceless against the domestic violence. Shakti New Zealand has been established in 1995. Since its inception, Shakti’s key strength has always been the advocates in the small regional offices who mobilised limited resources to cover crises lines, education of the general public, workshops, the welfare and safety of migrant women and children. Regardless of where one stands – in solidarity, by the helpline, with a stack of necessary forms, for a moment of silence – each volunteer paved the way towards the legislation against forced marriage in 2016. As Justice Minister Amy Adams noted, the legislative ban sends a clear message that our society refuses to accept such forms of violence.

    On 15 September, Volunteering New Zealand would like to recognise all the organisations and volunteer on the forefront of democratic change. Their combined efforts add maturity of our community. In the truest sense, they are the actors who still speak loud without words.

    If you are searching a suitable opportunity to get involved, visit our website for helpful resources. In Mahatma Gandhi’s famous words: “Be the change you wish to see in the world.”

    Volunteering New Zealand (VNZ) is an association of national volunteer-involving organisations that have a commitment to volunteering. Their mission is to maximise the impact of volunteering in our communities.

     http://www.volunteeringnz.org.nz/2017/06/nzf/ [Author, Hely Kim]
  • Lights, camera — just try it!

    Volunteering: From the Suffragist movement to election year voting

    September 19, 1893, marked a significant moment in the lives of New Zealand women. This day would indicate the beginning of a society in which women would be accepted a little bit more for their substance as a person, rather than their role as a wife or mother. Women such as Kate Sheppard may just be the epitome of what it is to volunteer for change that will be effective, and enduring.

    Through petitions and protests, the suffragists lifted the previously silent voices of New Zealand women. While it took decades for women to achieve their rights, and possibly not without the backing of powerful men, the suffragists fought to be one step closer in the struggle for equality. Today, thanks to the suffragist movement, we are in a position to push harder for such rights.

    While it may appear that we have made a lot of progress in 124 years, women of the 21st century continue to be somewhat “disenfranchised” in many ways. This is evident in the gender pay gap, women’s underrepresentation in government, domestic violence statistics, and the burden of domestic expectations, even for working women.

    However, women are in a better position today to make change, than in 1893. Volunteering offers opportunities to empower women in many ways, whether it be through campaigns, protests, educational tutoring, or supporting a local refuge, women everywhere still need the help of w

     

    This election year, we have a powerful opportunity to do just that. As we volunteer our time to participate in change for women, and for our country, we are reminded of the power such actions have. While change can often be slow, and may seem at times to take a step backwards, rather than succumbing to demoralization we can step up and make our vote count.  And lastly, let us be encouraged as to the impact our vote has. In the wise and courageous words of Kate Sheppard “Do not think you’re single vote does not mean much. The rain that refreshes the parched ground is made up of single drops”. Let us remember these words this election.

    – Kelly Redman

    Kelly is a Master’s student at the University of Waikato. Her focus is primarily on feminist issues such as inequality, and the consequences of sexist oppression. ”

    I wrote this article because I believe in the power that volunteering has in raising women’s voices, as well as the responsibility

    omen and men alike, to “take up the torch” and keep the suffragists movement active.

    we have to advocate for change. I am honoured to have been able to volunteer my time to VNZ, and to contribute to this cause. Nga manaakitanga.”

    News

    VNZ marks International Day of Democracy (15 September 2017)

    New Zealanders are facing an exciting month, as 2017 General Election is drawing near. While the excitement for the upcoming election continues to rise, International Day of Democracy on 15 September is sure to give us a welcome opportunity to reflect on the wider value of our democratic society. The theme for this year’s International Day of Democracy is peace and stability.

    As the UN envisions it, a truly democratic society is not only a system that allows each person to cast a single ballot, but also a space where all individuals have a chance to make their voices count. This month, New Zealand has a unique opportunity to strive towards an inclusive society built on accountable institutions at all levels – a society where everyone is valued, disputes are settled without violence, and vulnerable groups have access to appropriate support. Voters have known to experience both excitement and frustration after the election. However, at this critical moment, we must remember that voting is not the only way to express our opinions. It is certainly the most important process in any democratic society, but other channels of actions are also available.

    Volunteering is a good way to directly impact the community around us. First and foremost, volunteering is a democratic action that sustains an inclusive, fair society from the smallest level. Each volunteer’s action sends ripples through the society by making hidden issues visible and looking after the well-being of their local communities. In fact, even the government agencies may find their resources overstretched, if it weren’t for the contribution of countless volunteers across the nation. According to the data published on Stats.NZ, NGOs contributed $9.4 billion to New Zealand’s GDP in 2012 alone, which includes $3.5 billion generated by the labour of volunteers alone. Stats NZ also observes that the value of volunteering has been on the rise since 2004. Despite the reduction in the total hours of contribution, the loss has been made up by the increasing number of passionate volunteers who seek to change the world through their action.

    In the truest democratic fashion, NGOs across New Zealand are directly involved in shaping a better future. Shakti is one of those organisations. Run on the dedication of strong-willed volunteers, Shakti aids the migrant women and children who suffer from the lack of cultural understanding and language barrier, which leaves them defenceless against the domestic violence. Shakti New Zealand has been established in 1995. Since its inception, Shakti’s key strength has always been the advocates in the small regional offices who mobilised limited resources to cover crises lines, education of the general public, workshops, the welfare and safety of migrant women and children. Regardless of where one stands – in solidarity, by the helpline, with a stack of necessary forms, for a moment of silence – each volunteer paved the way towards the legislation against forced marriage in 2016. As Justice Minister Amy Adams noted, the legislative ban sends a clear message that our society refuses to accept such forms of violence.

    On 15 September, Volunteering New Zealand would like to recognise all the organisations and volunteer on the forefront of democratic change. Their combined efforts add maturity of our community. In the truest sense, they are the actors who still speak loud without words.

    If you are searching a suitable opportunity to get involved, visit our website for helpful resources. In Mahatma Gandhi’s famous words: “Be the change you wish to see in the world.”

    Volunteering New Zealand (VNZ) is an association of national volunteer-involving organisations that have a commitment to volunteering. Their mission is to maximise the impact of volunteering in our communities.

    http://www.volunteeringnz.org.nz/2017/06/lights-camera/ [Author, Laura Allen]
  • Media Release: Our Week to Recognise our 1.2 Million Volunteer Workforce http://www.scoop.co.nz/stories/AK1706/S00394/our-week-to-recognise-our-12-million-volunteer-workforce.htm
  • Volunteering Best Practice [dogoodjobs.co.nz] http://dogoodjobs.co.nz/guest-post-volunteering-best-practice/ [Author, Laura Allen]

May 2017 Newsletter

Read the latest news in our newsletter including:

  • New speakers announced for VNZ National Conference.
  • The countdown is on until we release InvolveMe.
  • Four new blog posts in May from Sandra KirbyCathy Aiavao, Julia Kennerley, and Olive Utiera.
  • Recognising volunteering in 2017: A report from Volunteer Canada and Investor’s Group, and other food for thought.

Find the May newsletter here.

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Volunteering Helps to End Hunger

Did you go to bed hungry last night? In New Zealand, about 40 per cent of New Zealand households go hungry, skip meals or scrimp on ingredients because they are not “food secure”. Or put another way, one in nine people in the world today (795 million) are undernourished, the vast majority in developing countries.

Today on World Hunger Day, Volunteering New Zealand (VNZ) promotes the efforts of volunteers who lend their time and skills to combat hunger and malnourishment.

The fight against hunger has progressed over the past 15 years. Worldwide hunger has declined, from 15 per cent according to figures for 2000 to 2002, to 11 per cent according to figures for 2014 to 2016.

Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) 2 outlines the United Nations’ targets for ending hunger, achieving food security and improved nutrition, and promoting sustainable agriculture. It aims to end hunger and all forms of malnutrition by 2030.

With its capacity for limiting human development, hunger creates a barrier to achieving the other Sustainable Development goals such as health, gender equality and education.

KidsCan, an organisation committed to supporting disadvantaged Kiwi children, relies on the support of volunteers to run programmes in 646 low-decile schools throughout the country. Each KidsCan school has a volunteer co-ordinator who plays a vital role in identifying need and making sure vulnerable children get the help they need.

“Children who are hungry are unable to concentrate at school,” KidsCan Chief Executive Julie Chapman says. “In the long term this can lead to poor health and social outcomes.”

Volunteers who work first hand with poor families and children can help challenge many myths and misconceptions surrounding poverty and hunger.

“The biggest myth is that families in poverty are spending their money unwisely,” says Chapman. “This is simply not the truth. The majority of parents are doing the best with what they have. The cost of housing and food outweighs the income families have.”

Chapman says that KidsCan aims to ensure all children experiencing food insecurity in early childhood and school education have access to food in their learning environment if they are experiencing food insecurity within five years.

From lending a hand in soup kitchen to packaging/donating meals or advocating for sustainable farming, volunteers play a variety of roles in ending hunger.

“The impact of volunteers in ending hunger is diverse and far reaching,” states Scott Miller, Chief Executive of Volunteering New Zealand. “Volunteering New Zealand is committed to recognising the key role they play in progressing the fight.”

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Student Volunteer Week recognises effort and achievements

Student Volunteer Week 2017 (SVW2017) commences today, providing an opportunity to recognise our national student volunteer effort and achievements.

Student Volunteer Week is a national campaign organised by Volunteering New Zealand which recognises the thousands of students, educational institutions, and community organisations growing the social capital of New Zealand.

The diverse range of events listed on www.studentvolunteerweek.nz include award ceremonies creative and quirky celebration events, and student-led community activities including outdoor beautification and clean-ups. Universities and volunteer centres throughout New Zealand will give students an opportunity to make a match with organisations who seek their help.

Student volunteers’ motivation is an area of interest to Professor Karen Smith at the School of Management, Victoria University of Wellington. In research Smith carried out a few years ago, she found “most important [to student motivation] was that they felt it was important to help others and work for causes that were important to them,” Smith said. Also important was that “they can see that volunteering can give them a new perspective and that it provides an opportunity to learn new things,” Smith says.

Many tertiary institutions already do a lot to help students get involved with charity and volunteer work. For many students, these efforts aligned with their social objectives, and are a highlight of university life, allowing them to have fun while engaging in important causes.

“Encouraging students to volunteer in their communities is an excellent way to develop their leadership skills and increase their chances of employment” says Volunteering New Zealand Chief Executive, Scott Miller.

To find out more about the breadth and depth of student volunteering going on across our communities, or to list your own event, check out www.studentvolunteerweek.nz.

Volunteering New Zealand (VNZ) is an association of national volunteer-involving organisations that have a commitment to volunteering. Their mission is to maximise the impact of volunteering in our communities.

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April 2017 Newsletter

The News for April includes some initial details about our 2017 National conference
on Monday 30, October 2017, with Masterclasses on the 31st.
Three new blog posts from VNZ members on volunteering topics.
News around NGOs and public policy matters, including funding issues and procurement.
A recent survey says the number of hours volunteered in the UK is reducing.
And much more…

Read it here



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March 2017 Newsletter

Items featured in the March 2017 newsletter include:

  • Visit the National Volunteer Week website at www.nationalvolunteerweek.nz.
  • JBWere The Cause Report released.
  • We’ve updated our Sector Research webpage with relevant research on various aspects of volunteering.
  • CAF Social Landscape 2017 Published.
  • Read the blog post from Helga Wientjes, Vice Chair, Volunteering New Zealand.
  • Sport Volunteering in New Zealand, a post from Ken Allen.
  • Volunteer Centres are about more than brokerage.
  • And events and workshops throughout New Zealand.

Sign up to VNZ’s newsletter.

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Volunteering Has A Place in Changing the World for Women

Today, March 8, marks International Women’s Day and Volunteering New Zealand (VNZ) supports this effort and the UN theme: Women in the Changing World of Work: Planet 50-50 by 2030.
According to the World Economic Forum, at the current rate, the gender gap will not close until the year 2186. This is too long to wait, and is a call to action.
Paid work is not the only indicator of the gender gap. According to the World Economic Forum political participation and power, education, and unpaid work that often goes ignored are also part of the gap.
VNZ Chair Karen Smith says, “One of the changes we can look at is better understanding and respect for the range of contributions that women make in society – whether that’s in paid employment or in the informal sector, volunteering, and other service in their community.”
“Volunteering can be an important aspect of women both gaining experience and developing confidence and knowledge that they can then take into the broader society,” Smith says.
The Bonn Call to Action from 2016, calls for volunteers to be a part of the solution to achieving the Sustainable Development Goals by 2030, stating “We recognise that communities must be at the centre of their own development, and that women and young people must be fully engaged.”
Volunteering can foster empowerment. The UN Population Fund articulates women’s empowerment as “women’s sense of self-worth, their right to have and determine choices; their right to control their own lives; and their ability to influence the direction of social change,” and we see that, worldwide, volunteering can expand those choices by providing opportunities for skill sharing and development and providing access to social networks that might not otherwise be formally available.
Volunteering shows that everyone has something to contribute and provides an opportunity for people to play fuller roles in their communities by making use of their skills and capacities.
Volunteering New Zealand (VNZ) is an association of national volunteer-involving organisations that have a commitment to volunteering. Their mission is to maximise the impact of volunteering in our communities. www.volunteeringnz.org.nz 
[ends]
FOR MORE INFORMATION
Scott Miller
Chief Executive, Volunteering New Zealand
021 190 1387

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February 2017 Newsletter

Items featured in the February 2017 newsletter include:

  • Three months ’til Student Volunteer Week 2017.
  • 2017 Volunteer Progress Report.
  • Good Deeds Day is 2 April.
  • Apply for a Catapult Community Leaders Scholarship for 2017.
  • Stuart Etherington’s New Year Letter to the Sector.
  • Apply the GIVERS framework to your volunteer management.
  • IAVE would like to hear your volunteering story.
  • And events throughout New Zealand.

,

December 2016 Newsletter

Untitled 2

 

 

 

Items featured in the December 2016 newsletter include:

  • Year in review: VNZ Publications in 2016
  • Sector research – 2016 Round-up
  • VNZ Governance Update – New Chair and Vice Chair
  • C&V Portfolio Update – New Minister Announced
  • VNZ 2017 Promotional Campaigns – Save these dates!
  • News from the sector

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November 2016 Newsletter

 

Items featured in the November 2016 newsletter include:

  • International Volunteer toolkit available for the 5 December 2016 event.
  • VNZ Annual Report now available.
  • Findings of The latest World Giving Index Report
  • Support the Bonn “Call to Action”
  • Date announced for National Volunteer Week 2017
  • and blog posts and stories you won’t want to miss…

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VNZ News – October 2016

Items featured in this month’s newsletter include: International Volunteer Managers Day – 5 November 2016 – toolkit available; Results of the latest ComVoices State of the Sector Survey find that the holes are getting bigger in the safety net provided by the Community Sector; Theme for 2016 International Volunteer Day – 5 December will be: Together we can.

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Police Vetting Bill Outcome – Democracy in Action

The Government’s announcement that explicit exemptions have been provided for the voluntary sector in the Policing (Cost Recovery) Amendment Bill is ‘democracy in action’ says Scott Miller, Chief Executive of Volunteering New Zealand.

The recent announcement signals fee-waivers in the Regulations of the Bill which will include exemptions for registered charities and agencies making 20 police-vetting requests or fewer per year.

“Volunteering New Zealand, on behalf of its members and the 1.2 million volunteers that it works to support, is pleased that our constructive conversations with Minister Collins, the Maori Party, Labour Party and United Future have all been able to give a certain degree of comfort to our sector”, states Miller.

The Bill will amend the Policing Act 2008 in order to place a fee on specified demand services such as police vetting, a service that volunteer groups rely on to ensure the safety of vulnerable people they support. However, “when additional cost is imposed on the sector, an additional barrier is imposed on community groups also working to keep communities, volunteers and support staff safe” says Miller.

“Democracy is enacted when parties work together to find a compromise outcome that yields as much benefit as possible” states Miller. “Volunteering New Zealand is therefore pleased to have been part of this important work for the sector, and commend the various political parties honouring the Government Policy on volunteering that seeks to support and value the vital work of volunteers across the country” Miller concludes.

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VNZ News – September 2016

September 2016 newsletter

Items featured in this month’s newsletter include:

  • Charity Viewpoint 2016 Report released.
  • International Volunteer Managers Day promotional materials released.
  • Policing (Cost Recovery) Amendment Bill update.
  • IAVE’s Handbook on Youth, Volunteering and Employment released.
  • Various media on volunteer management.

View the September 2016 newsletter

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VNZ Newsletter – July 2016

Items featuring in the July 2016 Newsletter include: 

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  • Developing your volunteer programme: Resource released by Volunteer Wellington
  • The Ministry of Social Development release ‘The Social Report 2016’
  • Charities Services provide data on volunteering in registered charities
  • IHC embraces sector need to offer episodic volunteering
  • Plus lots more news and events to ensure you are up to date.

State of the World’s Volunteerism report released

Volunteering New Zealand has released a report on The State of the World’s Volunteerism. This summary report represents VNZ’s interpretation of the key points of the United Nations’ State of the World’s Volunteerism Report (2015), and focuses on key points relevant to the New Zealand volunteering context. It is not written to replace or otherwise substitute the UN report, which readers are encouraged to engage with independently of this report.

Read the VNZ media release here.

View the full State of the World’s Volunteerism Report (PDF).

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VNZ Newsletter – May 2016

Read the May 2016 VNZ newsletter. National Volunteer Week update, New research on the NZ NFP Sector, A report card on the State of Volunteering in NZ, the Australian State of Volunteering Report and other news from around the sector. Click here.

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March News 2016

Read our VNZ March newsletter here. MOH awards are open for nominations, State of Volunteering in NZ report released and other news from around the sector.

State of Volunteering in NZ Report Released

Volunteering New Zealand has announced the results of its inaugural State of the New Zealand Volunteering Sector survey.

Read the VNZ media release here.

View the full New Zealand Volunteering Sector Report here.

February News 2016

February news from VNZ including update from Chief Executive, Scott Miller, other items of interest to the voluntary sector and note worthy blogs. Read the newsletter here.

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December 2015 News

Read the December update from VNZ here.

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November 2015 News

November news from VNZ 2015 International Volunteer Day, conference wrap-up, and a new VNZ Board Member. Read the newsletter here.

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Health and Safety at Work Act Q+A

Conference Q&A for Worksafe

Read WorkSafe’s response to questions about the Health and Safety at Work Act from

the VNZ conference here.

 

WorkSafe’s website

Read more on how volunteers are covered under the new Act on WorkSafe’s website here.

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October 2015 News

October news for the voluntary sector including a Parliamentary breakfast, International Managers of Volunteers Day, and VNZ’s partnership with Neighbourly. Read our October newsletter here.

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September 2015 News

September news for the voluntary sector including VNZ Conference update, a Parliamentary save-the-date and our latest survey. Read our newsletter here.

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August Voluntalk Newsletter

August’s news from VNZ including the VNZ 2015 conference, NZ Student Volunteer Week, member welcome, Rob Jackson’s NZ tour and other snippets of information relevant to the New Zealand voluntary sector.

Read our August newsletter here

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July Voluntalk Newsletter

July’s news from VNZ including the latest on NZ regulatory developments, a new Australian definition of volunteering, plans for NZ Student Volunteer Week and other snippets of information relevant to the New Zealand voluntary sector.

Read our July Newsletter here

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Health and Safety Update

The Select Committee considering the Health and Safety Reform Bill has made improvements to the Bill so coverage of volunteers and volunteering organisations will remain as it is under the current law.

Read our Health and Safety Update here

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Voluntalk News – June 2015

News from VNZ including National Volunteer Week 2015 wrap up, BPIA Champions and other stories relevant to the New Zealand voluntary sector.

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Advocacy Update – June 2015

Check out VNZ’s Advocacy Update for June 2015.

You”ll find plenty of volunteer related advocacy that VNZ is working on for volunteers and volunteer-involving organisations in New Zealand!

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