Sector Research

VNZ has recently updated information about relevant research on various aspects of volunteering, including policy research, social psychological aspects of volunteering, gender, ethnicity and disability as well as more practically focused research. Articles are from 2000-2016 and will be updated yearly. We will continue to add topics in coming weeks. (22/2/2017)

Thanks to librarian Dianna Roberts for her volunteer assistance and expertise.
Where full text is not available ask your local library to obtain a copy for you.

    • Canadian Code for Volunteer Involvement (CCVI)
      Volunteer Canada, 2012.
      The CCVI is a framework for involving volunteers in all levels of an organization. This includes volunteers working in leadership, direct service and virtual roles.
      Download the Canadian Code for Volunteer Involvement

      Involving volunteers from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds
      National Volunteers Skills Centre, Volunteering Australia. Information sheet, January 2006.
      Many organisations would like to involve volunteers from diverse cultures, but some are unsure of how to engage with CALD communities. In this information sheet we will look at tips for engaging with CALD communities, and for recruiting and managing volunteers from diverse backgrounds.
      Download the PDF: Involving volunteers from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds

      Mana Mahi Resource: a guide to the employment of people in the Tangata Whenua, Community and Voluntary Sector Organisation
      A series of guides and resources on employment relations issues for tangata whenua, community and voluntary sector organisations. ManaMahi contains 17 best practice guides and 6 resource booklets relating to a wide range of employment relations issues.
      Go to Mana Mahi Resources

      Mana Mahi Update 2: A Guide to the Employment of People in the Tangata Whenua, Community and Voluntary Sector Organisations
      Updates the main Mana Mahi employment resource and should be read along with it. Includes information on the recent changes to the Employment Relations Act 2000 and the Holidays Act plus additional information on collective agreements and their application in this sector.
      Download the PDF: Mana Mahi Update2

      Summary of Key Findings of “What works? A systematic review of research and evaluation literature on encouragement and support of volunteering”
      Victoria Business School [2010?]
      The Department of Internal Affairs commissioned a systematic literature review to assist Lottery Grants Board and its distribution committees to make distribution decisions that are evidence-based, and to focus on the most effective interventions. The literature review summarises academic sport and practitioner research and evaluation from New Zealand and overseas – mostly Australia, the United Kingdom and the United States – on what works to encourage participation in volunteering and support the management of volunteers. The review highlights research on volunteering in areas funded by Lottery Grants Board, for example, environment and heritage, and community and social services.
      Download the PDF: Summary of Key Findings of “What works?”

      Sustainable Management Practices in the Voluntary Sector.
      Torstonson, Sharon. Community Research Organisation. (2007)
      We have become more aware that it’s not enough just to work for changes elsewhere in our community and society. We also had to look at our own behaviour. This increasing awareness has led us to a number of new or changed policies and practices, some more challenging than others and all requiring new ways of thinking and behaviours.
      Download the PDF: Sustainable Management Practices in the Voluntary Sector

      Volunteer peer supervision: in an ever-changing social service environment
      by Jason Rushton Aotearoa New Zealand social work: review, 2015; v.27 n.3:p.68-77.
      Aims to spark a conversation surrounding the importance of peer supervision with social service volunteers from the New Zealand Federation of Voluntary Welfare Organisations (NZFVWO).

      Go to Ebsco to read article

      Volunteer-related training in emergency services: findings from qualitative research
      Pells, Sharon (2008), NZIER.
      Qualitative research (depth interviews with 52 emergency services volunteers and other stakeholders) to identify how to lift training participation of emergency services volunteers, and the impact of training on service delivery.
      Download the PDF:Volunteer-related training in emergency services

      Volunteerism: Alive and Well or Dying Quietly? Learnings from New Zealand community based organisations, volunteerism experts and social enterprises
      Wanwimolruk, M. (2014) Community Research Organisation.
      A reworked extract from a wider report on volunteering in Plunket.
      What are the key success factors for the organisations that are doing well in the volunteering space? What are some common challenges? What learnings can be shared for the benefit of others in the Third Sector?

      Download the PDF:Volunteerism: Alive and Well or Dying Quietly?

      What works? A systematic review of research and evaluation literature on encouragement and support of volunteering
      Department of Internal Affairs: DIA June 2010
      In the survey, sports volunteers report many positive experiences but also identify some challenges and barriers to successful volunteering. This report includes recommendations on ways to improve the sports volunteer experience.

      Go to the article: What works? A systematic review of research and evaluation literature…

    • Assessing the benefits for conservation of volunteer involvement in conservation activities
      Karen Bell, New Zealand. Department of Conservation. 2003.
      The report investigates the existing benefits of the Conservation Volunteer Programme for both conservation advocacy and the volunteers, discusses whether this programme is meeting conservation advocacy goals, and then makes recommendations about improving the programme to meet these goals.
      Download the PDF:Assessing the benefits for conservation of volunteer involvement in conservation activities

      Your park in your hands: a guide to volunteering in our parks.
      North Shore City (N.Z.). City Council. Print book Publication: [Auckland, N.Z.]: North Shore City, 2006.
      Check with your library.

      Assessing the benefits for conservation of volunteer involvement in conservation activities
      Author: Bell, Karen (Karen Sarah)
      Publisher: Wellington, N.Z.: Dept. of Conservation, c2003.
      ISBN: 0478224397 (pbk.)
      Description: 56 p.: ill. ; 30 cm.
      Volunteer workers in conservation of natural resources–New Zealand; Conservation of natural resources–New Zealand; Wildlife management–New Zealand; Nature conservation–New Zealand; Environmental protection–New Zealand; Voluntarism–New Zealand–Evaluation.
      Series: Science for conservation; 223.

      Check with your library.

      Valuing community group contributions to conservation
      Author: Ned Hardie-Boys
      Publisher: Department of Conservation
      Journal: Science for Conservation 299. 68 p. 2010
      201 community partners of the Department of Conservation participated in a survey investigating the types and benefits of their partnership arrangements, and the value of the resources they contribute to conservation activities. The groups contributed approximately $15.8 million over the 12 months surveyed, representing a return of $3–$4 for every $1 of government funding. Groups were making the greatest contribution to increasing community participation and the least contribution to improving historic/cultural heritage. The report identifies recommendations to support improvements in policy making and planning, and service delivery when working with the community and voluntary sector.
      Download the PDF:Valuing community group contributions to conservation

    • Business community partnerships in New Zealand: Understanding experiences of partnership
      Dr Louise Lee, Department of Management College of Business Massey University, 2007.
      This research examined business community partnerships that address social issues. The study demonstrated that pragmatic versions of partnership are more concerned with the self-interests of the stakeholders, rather than shared community concerns. The findings highlight trust, power and the negotiation of mutual interests as critical issues to understanding business community partnerships in the NZ context.
      Download the PDF: Business community partnerships in New Zealand

      Corporate social responsibility and the Millennials.
      McGlone, Teresa; Spain, Judith Winters; McGlone, Vernon. Journal of Education for Business. Jul/Aug2011, Vol. 86 Issue 4, p195-200. 6p.
      The authors examined the corporate social responsibility (CSR) attitudes of college students and the correlation of these attitudes with willingness to work for companies that emphasize CSR through employee volunteerism. The outcome from an event consisting of 9 high-level executives from for- and nonprofit companies explaining their CSR philosophy to these students is described. Results indicated that the event itself was responsible for changes in the students’ attitudes and were not correlated with earlier attitudes or actions.
      Check with your library.

      Corporate volunteering: a case study centred on the motivations, satisfaction and happiness of company employees.
      Paço, Arminda do; Nave, Ana Cláudia. Employee Relations. 2013, Vol. 35 Issue 5, p547-559. 13p.
      The purpose of this paper is to analyse the motivations that lead employees to agree to participate in the corporate volunteering activities promoted by their companies, as well as to assess their level of satisfaction and happiness with the activity of volunteering. The results indicate a similar hierarchical organisation of the motivations when compared with some previous studies. The volunteers’ experience is satisfactory in all aspects, and is positively related to feelings of happiness. However, the results evidence a weak/moderate relation between volunteers’ motivations and happiness/satisfaction.
      Check with your library.

      Corporate volunteering: benefits and challenges for nonprofits
      O Samuel, P Wolf, A Schilling – Nonprofit Management and Leadership, Volume 24, Issue 2 Winter 2013 p 63–179.
      Key findings suggest that a majority of the questioned nonprofits lack strategic behavior and management tools for undertaking volunteer partnership projects with companies. This article suggests that the key to successful future cooperation between nonprofits and profit-oriented organizations lies in the processes of internal evaluation and subsequent strategy development.
      Check with your library.

      Corporate volunteering–business implementation issues
      L Lee. International Journal of Business Environment, Volume 4 issue 2. 2011.
      Louise Lee is a Lecturer in the School of Management at Massey University, Wellington, New Zealand. This paper provides practice-based insights into corporate social responsibility (CSR) implementation by examining business managers’ understandings of the drivers and operating practices for corporate volunteer schemes and the challenges facing business managers in implementing such initiatives. Managers face challenges organising corporate volunteering programmes in ways that support significant social goals, while serving strategic business interests and offering meaningful experiences for employees.
      Check with your library.

      Corporate volunteering : how to support your staff to support your community
      Vanisa Dhiru. Human Resources Magazine. Jun/Jul2014, Vol. 19 Issue 2, p24-25. 2p.
      Volunteering New Zealand talks to HRINZ about what corporate volunteering is, the benefits for all the parties involved and what can be done to improve the practice in the future.
      Check with your library.

      Corporate citizenship is linked to business success, says Stanley Litow, IBM Foundation [Interviews]
      Chaturvedi, Anumeha. The Economic Times (Online) [New Delhi] 14 Feb 2015.
      Stanley Litow, vice president – corporate citizenship and corporate affairs, and president, IBM Foundation, spoke to ET about the importance of employee volunteerism in corporate citizenship and how it has evolved from a cheque-book philanthropic model to providing sustainable, measurable reforms and even curbing attrition.
      Check with your library.

      Employee volunteering : Observations from the front-line: A report on community & business perspectives on employee volunteering in New Zealand
      Dr Louise Lee, Department of Management College of Business Massey University, 2008.
      Louise Lee interviewed managers from 29 organisations as part of research on community and business perspectives on employee volunteering in New Zealand.
      Download the PDF:Employee volunteering : Observations from the front-line


      Exploring partnerships from the perspective of HSO beneficiaries: The case of corporate volunteering.

      Samuel, Olga; Roza, Lonneke; Meijs, Lucas. Human Service Organizations: Management, Leadership & Governance. Jun-Aug 2016, Vol. 40 Issue 3, p220-237.
      Key findings suggest that beneficiaries’ perceptions are influenced by involvement in the development of the projects, the perceived quality of interaction, and the sustainability. The authors conclude that beneficiaries welcome the change in their daily routines, while acknowledging the lack of reciprocity but argue that corporate volunteering does not necessarily produce a win-win situation.
      Check with your library.

      The giving generation.
      Agovino, Theresa. HR Magazine. Sep2016, Vol. 61 Issue 7, p36-44. 6p.
      The article examines how successful companies are encouraging employees to be involved in charitable works and volunteer activities.
      Check with your library.

      Giving time, time after time: Work design and sustained employee participation in corporate volunteering
      AM Grant. Academy of Management Review; Oct 2012, Vol. 37 Issue 4, p589.
      Corporate volunteering programs are important channels for expressing care and compassion, but little research has examined when and why employees sustain involvement. Integrating work design and volunteering theories, the author introduces a model that explains how depleted task, social, and knowledge characteristics of jobs trigger compensatory motives during initial volunteering episodes.
      Go to the article:Giving time, time after time

      Global corporate volunteering : handbook and business cases
      Madrid: Foundation CODESPA, 2012.
      This guide approaches Global Corporate Volunteering (CV) through a series of essays, interviews, and case studies that present good practices of companies from all over the world that innovated and resolved challenges through Global CV. The contributions are from experts and organizations with an international consolidated track record.
      Download the PDF: Global corporate volunteering

      Global Corporate Volunteering – Interim report 2011
      This report contains interim results on the regional and global assessment of the nature and scope of corporate volunteering worldwide and region by region and the trends, challenges and opportunities that are shaping it. It also contains the Global Companies Study which focuses on how global companies organise and manage their volunteer efforts.
      Download the PDF: Interim report 2011

      The impact of corporate volunteering on CSR image: A consumer perspective.
      Plewa, Carolin; Conduit, Jodie; Quester, Pascale; Johnson, Claire. Journal of Business Ethics. Mar2015, Vol. 127 Issue 3, p643-659. 17p.
      This study takes a preliminary step towards understanding consumers’ response to corporate volunteering initiatives. It demonstrates that CV programmes have a positive impact on stakeholder groups, impacting positively on consumers’ perceptions of the firm and their cognitive, attitudinal and behavioural loyalty. It is hoped this study will inspire future research into CV as an important CSR initiative and that it will encourage firms to continue to pursue CV, a socially responsible activity that benefits many groups within the community.
      Check with your library.

      Internal marketing for engaging employees on the corporate responsibility journey.
      Sanchez-Hernandez, Isabel; Grayson, David. Intangible Capital. 2012, Vol. 8 Issue 2, p275-307.
      The results suggest that managers must ensure that internal aspects of management, such as internal communication and employee commitment are taken into account in order to get success in corporate responsibility issues. Managers need to be more proactive trying to introduce the marketing function in human capital issues. Understanding employees’ wants and needs and selling internally responsibility goals would make external efforts in developing a responsible strategy much more likely to succeed.
      Check with your library.

      The invisible crowd – valuing volunteer services
      Narraway, Gwyn; Cordery, Carolyn. Chartered Accountants Journal of New Zealand, Dec 2006; v.85 n.11:p.71-72.
      Assesses available models for not-for-profit entities to measure the value of time donated by volunteers to their organisations in order to be able to include that value in their statements of financial performance.
      Check with your library.

      Leadership : profiles in corporate philanthropy
      Compiled and illustrated by Aaron Hurst and Tal Kapulnik. New York: Taproot Foundation, 2012.
      Highlights of interviews with 21 corporate leaders about their careers, passions and the evolving relationship between business and community.
      Download the PDF: Leadership : profiles in corporate philanthropy

      (Mis)Using employee volunteering for public relations: Implications for corporate volunteers’ organizational commitment
      Mignonac, Karim; Gatignon-Turnau, Anne-Laure. Academy of Management Annual Meeting Proceedings. 2013, p203-208. 6p.
      Company support for employee volunteering (CSEV is a corporate social responsibility (CSR) activity that offers great potential for strategic and human resource management, such as enhancement of employee motivation and commitment, cohesion and teamwork, professional development, as well as reputational gains with regard to investors, clients and future employees. This study makes the general assumption that employee perceptions of what the volunteering program means to the company can affect how employees themselves respond attitudinally to company support for employee volunteering.
      Check with your library.

      Social responsibility climate as a double-edged sword: How employee-perceived social responsibility climate shapes the meaning of their voluntary work?
      Yim, Frederick; Fock, Henry. Journal of Business Ethics 114.4 (Jun 2013): 665-674.
      This study argues the need to enhance volunteer work meanings. The authors hypothesize that pride in volunteer work and volunteering as a calling are determinants of perceptions of the meaningfulness of volunteer work. In addition, they reveal that an organization’s social responsibility climate (SRC) is a key moderator in these relationships.
      Check with your library.

      Sweet charity
      Luxmoore, Alaina. Employment today (Auckland, N.Z.), May 2015; n.191:p.38-41.
      Discusses the merits of businesses being involved with charities, the community and environmental issues. Encourages a new approach to managing social responsibility in businesses – in particular employee-led philanthropy.
      Check with your library.

      The volunteer culture
      Hurley, Lynette. Engineering insight, Nov/Dec 2013; v.14 n.6:p.32-33.
      Focuses on the work of Engineers Without Borders New Zealand (EWBNZ), which is an organisation of engineering professionals and students who volunteer their time to deliver humanitarian engineering to disadvantaged communities in NZ and the Pacific. Talks about the important role sponsors’ Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) activities play in achieving the organisation’s goals.
      Check with your library.

    • Engaging Queenslanders : a guide to engaging people with a disability
      (2007) Brisbane: Department of Communities  (3), 2007
      While the guide’s title refers to engaging people with a disability, successful engagement programs are likely to also involve the families and carers of people with a disability, people who work for disability organisations in a paid or voluntary capacity, public advocates, academics and others with an active interest in disability issues.
      Download the PDF: Engaging Queenslanders : a guide to engaging people with a disability
      Brisbane:

      Gain without pain : how the voluntary sector can help deliver the social care agenda for people with disabilities
      Institute of Public Care, Oxford Brookes University, 2010 ;  Voluntary Organisations Disability Group, 2010
      Big cuts in public spending make it all the more necessary to find new ways of working. The VODG wants to work with councils to transform services for disabled people. In a series of case studies from 10 charities, all of them VODG members, Gain Without Pain shows how the innovation and expertise of the voluntary sector can be harnessed to improve public services and save money at the same time. The case studies demonstrate that services can be organised around the needs of disabled people in radically new ways without resorting to the widely expected slash and burn approaches to cost-cutting by the public sector.
      Read the report: Gain without pain

      To stand beside: the advocacy for inclusion training manual: empowering people who support, assist or represent people with intellectual disability.
      Stone, Kevin. Fyshwick, ACT:  Stone & Associates, 1999. 178 p.; 28 cm. 0646382993.
      This manual is intended to be used in conjunction with advocacy training programs, workshops and seminars.  Aimed at independent voluntary and paid advocates and those who might have an indirect role in advocating the interests of people with a disability, such as people working in social and community welfare agencies, residential support services, as well as people with a disability and family members.  Broken into 6 sections – power, mission, vision, roles, skills, methods.
      Check with your library.

    • Volunteering: a choice or responsibility?
      Katene, Rahui. Playcentre Journal, Win 2010; n.138:p.14-15.
      Presents a speech by Rahui Katene, Member of Parliament for Te Tai Tonga, on the importance of every family’s contribution to our children’s and communities’ successful future. Looks at how the volunteer base is supported.

      Check with your library.

      Janis Blong Toktok: Pri-Skul Asosiesen Blong/ Vanuatu and the role of New Zealand Volunteers
      Author:  Dr Peter Swain, Jennifer James & John Schischka
      Publisher:  Te Tūao Tāwāhi Volunteer Service Abroad, Wellington
      Year:   2008
      Summary: Janis Blong Toktok, a “chance to talk”, is a qualitative analysis of the contribution of VSA volunteers to the development of early childhood education through partnership with the Pri-Skul Asosiesen Blong Vanuatu (PSABV).  Janis Blong Toktok tells the story of the development of vilij kindi and the impact of the VSA volunteers, in partnership with PSABV, on the development of educational opportunities and on the local children and their communities.  This case study gives voice to the aspiration of Ni-Vanuatu for quality education, and identifies a recent shift towards an indigenous approach to education in Vanuatu.


    • CDEM Competency Framework Technical Standard [TS 02/09]
      Wellington : Civil Defence Emergency Management, 2009.
      The Framework is the result of extensive work across the CDEM sector and its release signified the beginning of our journey towards professionalising emergency management in New Zealand.

      Read the PDF: CDEM Competency Framework Technical Standard

      Centralised coordination of spontaneous emergency volunteers: the EV CREW model
      Blythe McLennan, Julie Molloy, Joshua Whitaker, John Handmer. Australian journal of emergency management, Volume 31 Issue 1, 2016.
      This paper presents spontaneous volunteering as an empowering and legitimate component of recovery and resilience and, when coordinated appropriately, it adds value to recovery, is rewarding for volunteers, and reduces associated risks for volunteers, recipient organisations and communities. It also emphasises that central coordination does not replace traditional emergency management volunteering nor informal helping behaviour and emergent volunteerism.

      Go to the article: Centralised coordination of spontaneous emergency volunteers

      Describing the value of the contribution from the volunteer fire brigade
      PricewaterhouseCoopers (N.Z.) , New Zealand Fire Service Commission. Print book. [Wellington, N.Z.] : New Zealand Fire Service Commission, [2010]
      This research examines the economic and social value of volunteer fire brigades in small remote communities in New Zealand. Based on desk research, a survey and interviews, it describes and measures the non-monetary benefits that a volunteer fire brigade contributes to these communities and estimates the economic value added to them.
      Go to the PDF: Describing the value of the contribution from the volunteer fire brigade

      Factors influencing the successful integration of ambulance volunteers and first responders into ambulance services
      O’Meara, Peter, Vianne Tourle, and John Rae. Health & social care in the community 20.5 (2012): 488-496.|
      This study identifies the factors associated with the successful integration of ambulance volunteers and first responders into major ambulance services in Australia and New Zealand and then proposes a model of volunteer management for ambulance services. If the suggested approaches were replicated more widely, a viable and effective volunteer emergency health response system could be established in those areas where it is uneconomic or impractical to provide a salaried ambulance service staffed with professionally qualified paramedics.
      Check Google Scholar.

      Glimpses of a better world: The role of tangata whenua, community & voluntary sector in the Canterbury earthquake recovery
      Address to Our Future Community and Voluntary Sector Forum, Hosted by Council of Social Services Christchurch and Te Runaka ki Otautahi Kai Tahu, Christchurch, 28 July 2011.
      One of the tribute songs written following the Canterbury earthquake includes the line “We are not heroes; we are a team”. In the aftermath of our quakes, who could be failed to be moved by so many people suddenly becoming altruistic, resilient, resourceful, and brave, stirred and motivated by a newfound sense of community and purpose. We have seen glimpses of a better world.
      Go to the PDF: Glimpses of a better world

      Helping the helpers: assisting staff and volunteer workers before, during, and after disaster relief operations
      Quevillon, Randal P., et al. Journal of clinical psychology, Volume 72, Issue 12 Dec. 2016.
      This article emphasizes the role of both individual and management participation and commitment to relief worker support and positive experience in DROs and provides suggestions for doing so. These suggestions are derived from the empirical and experiential literature and extensions from the theoretical background, and from our experience as managers in DROs.
      Check PubMed.

      Mental health needs of disaster volunteers: a plea for awareness
      Lavonne M. Adams. Perspectives in psychiatric care, Volume 43, Issue 1 February 2007 Pages 52–54.
      Disaster response volunteers may experience mental health needs, particularly following extended or multiple deployments. This article attempts to heighten the awareness of psychiatric mental health nurses regarding mental health needs of disaster volunteers.
      Check PubMed.

      Responders : the New Zealand volunteer response teams, Christchurch earthquake deployments
      Pete Seager, Deb Donnell Format: Print book Publication year: 2013.
      Behind the scenes of the February 2011 Christchurch Earthquake and the Civil Defence & Emergency Management registered volunteer teams deployment
      https://tepuna.on.worldcat.org/oclc/828626926?databaseList=283&databaseList=3928&databaseList=3930&scope=sz:36639

      Report on the attraction, support and retention of emergency management volunteers : executive summary
      Esmond, Judy. Commonwealth of Australia, 2009.
      The aim of the Volunteer Action Plan is to outline options to enhance the attraction, support and retention of emergency management volunteers. The Plan proposes 11 national actions to enhance volunteer attraction, support and retention. The proposed actions have been prioritised into three categories (top priority, medium priority and lower priority), according to feedback received during a consultation process with the jurisdictions and volunteer peak bodies.
      Go to the PDF: Report on the attraction, support and retention of emergency management volunteers

      Spontaneous volunteer management resource kit
      Australian Red Cross, 2010.
      Includes a framework and supporting materials that aim to help better manage spontaneous volunteers in an emergency, regardless of whether they are used.
      Go to the PDF: Spontaneous volunteer management resource kit

      State Emergency Service (SES) volunteer members : an investigation into coping abilities and adjustment strategies following emergency activations
      Shipley, Felicity; Gow, Kathryn. Australasian Journal of Disaster and Trauma Studies (Online), 2006; n.1.
      Examines the individual utilisation of coping abilities and adjustment strategies of State Emergency Service (SES) volunteer members following stressful incident call-outs. Reports on the range of idiosyncratic individualised coping abilities and deliberate adjustment strategies of SES volunteer members.

      A study of recruitment and retention of volunteer emergency personnel and the implications for the New Zealand Fire Service : what if you had an emergency and no one came? : for paper 130.703: Project in emergency management
      Ian R. King. Thesis/dissertation. [2007]
      Project in emergency management (Grad. Dip. Emerg. Mgt.)–Massey University, Palmerston North, 2007.
      [No summary available]
      Studying social technologies and communities of volunteers in emergency management
      Herranz, S. [et al.] In: C&T’13: Proceedings of the 6th International Conference on Communities and Technology, Munich, Germany, 2013.
      Communities of volunteers are fundamental agents in the emergency management process. In spite of the unquestionable value that social technologies could bring to such communities of volunteers it is not clear whether they are exploiting all their potential and why. The results of the study suggest the need to address specific design challenges related to reliability, integrity, and efficient analysis of information.
      Training for rural firefighters : motivators and impediments
      Corydon Consultants. Print book. [Wellington, N.Z.]: New Zealand Fire Service Commission, [2008]

      Volunteer coordination in CDEM : director’s guideline for Civil Defence emergency management groups
      Wellington, N.Z.: Ministry of Civil Defence & Emergency Management, 2013. DGL 15/13.
      Provides a broad overview of volunteer coordination, with a particular focus on CDEM-trained volunteers (community members who are registered, screened and trained during readiness), and spontaneous volunteers (who emerge during response).
      Read the PDF: Volunteer coordination in CDEM : director’s guideline for Civil Defence emergency management groups

    • Enthusiasm expected; experience not essential: New Zealand sporting event organisers and the volunteer workforce
      Joany Grima, 2014. A research report presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the diploma of Postgraduate Diploma in Business and Administration in Communication Management at Massey University, Wellington, New Zealand.
      The results of this research show that volunteers are highly valued by event organisers, are treated considerately and are central to the successful delivery of sporting events in New Zealand, regardless of size or scope. The impact of volunteers on the delivery of sporting events was found to be significant; highlighting the possibility that many events would be at risk of not being staged without the volunteer support they have come to depend on. Read the PDF Enthusiasm expected; experience not essential

      Finding and keeping volunteers: what the research tells us
      Department of Internal Affairs, with: Sport New Zealand. 2006
      Understanding volunteering from the perspective of those who volunteer was the central theme of the study. It provides recommended actions. Read the Report: Finding and keeping volunteers: what the research tells us

      Government involvement in New Zealand Sport – sport policy: a cautionary tale.
      Lawrence, H. D. V. (2008). (Thesis, Master of Sport and Leisure Studies (MSpLS)). The University of Waikato.
      This thesis examines the impact of government intervention on the sport sector, its funding paradigms and the extent of sector engagement in a policy for sport. It also provides a rationale for revitalising the engagement between government and the New Zealand sport sector to meet the expectations of a modern state sector to meaningfully engage citizens and the non-government sector in the formation of policy and planning its implementation. Check with your library.

      Social capital production: sport event volunteer perceptions and impacts
      Tidey, Ann. (Thesis for Master of Business, Auckland University of Technology. 2010)
      The challenge for event managers is to understand social capital generation so that organisational needs might be better balanced with the needs of volunteers. Research on the social capital concept relies on qualitative analysis techniques, reflecting that social capital is borne out of relationships which constantly change. It is the location, quality and quantity of interactions which determine whether social capital is produced and used, and can impact the success of sport event strategies. While community groups share a common incentive for supporting events with the payment of crew, the incentive is not a catalyst for forging bridging ties. Additionally, the bridging ties of volunteer event directors to community groups are fragile. As intermediaries they put in the most effort for least social and economic reward. This fragility, combined with the expectations placed upon these intermediaries by event organisations could place the event industry in Taupo in jeopardy and warrants review. Check with your library

      Sport and active recreation in the lives of New Zealand adults: 2013/14 Active New Zealand Survey results
      Kay Haughey. Sport New Zealand, 2015.
      This initial survey report provides an up-to-date snapshot on how, when and where adults are engaging in sport and active recreation as participants and volunteers, includes results about levels of volunteering and volunteer roles and changes in participation (including in popular activities) and volunteering between 2007/08 and 2013/14. Read the PDF: Sport and active recreation in the lives of New Zealand adults: 2013/14 Active New Zealand Survey results

      Sports volunteers’ experiences survey
      Department of Internal Affairs, with: Sport New Zealand. 2011
      Sports volunteers report many positive experiences but also identify some challenges and barriers to successful volunteering. Read the Report: Sports volunteers’ experiences survey

      Valuing your sports volunteers : how to recruit, retain, recognise and reward your volunteers
      Simon Kirkland. Print book Publication: Leeds [England] : Published on behalf of Sport England by Coachwise Business Solutions, 2006. Check with your library.

      Volunteering insights report
      GEMBA, comissioned by Sport New Zealand. 2015.
      This report employs data collected via the GEMBA sports and entertainment report (GSER) to provide insights about New Zealand sport and recreation volunteers. A range of topics are explored including volunteering roles, frequency and length of volunteering, intention to continue volunteering, motivations, and volunteer development. Read the PDF: Volunteering insights report

      Volunteers : the heart of sport : the experiences and motivations of sports volunteers.
      SPARC (Organization : N.Z.). Wellington, N.Z. : SPARC, [2008]

      Findings from the Sports Volunteers’ Experiences Survey conducted on behalf of Sports and Recreation New Zealand (SPARC). In the survey, sports volunteers report many positive experiences but also identify some challenges and barriers to successful volunteering.

      Download the PDF Volunteers : the heart of sport : the experiences and motivations of sports volunteers.

      What works? A systematic review of research and evaluation literature on encouragement and support of volunteering
      Department of Internal Affairs: DIA June 2010.
      In the survey, sports volunteers report many positive experiences but also identify some challenges and barriers to successful volunteering. This report includes recommendations on ways to improve the sports volunteer experience. Download the Report: What works? A systematic review of research and evaluation literature on encouragement and support of volunteering

    • Corporate social responsibility and the Millennials.
      McGlone, Teresa; Spain, Judith Winters; McGlone, Vernon. Journal of Education for Business. Jul/Aug2011, Vol. 86 Issue 4, p195-200. 6p.
      The authors examined the corporate social responsibility (CSR) attitudes of college students and the correlation of these attitudes with willingness to work for companies that emphasize CSR through employee volunteerism. The outcome from an event consisting of 9 high-level executives from for- and nonprofit companies explaining their CSR philosophy to these students is described. Results indicated that the event itself was responsible for changes in the students’ attitudes and were not correlated with earlier attitudes or actions.
      Available at your library through Ebscohost
      A cross-cultural examination of student volunteering: Is it all about résumé building?
      F. Handy [et al.] Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly, September 3, 2009.
      Findings suggest that students motivated to volunteer for building their résumés do not volunteer more than students with other motives. However, in countries with a positive signaling value of volunteering, volunteering rates are significantly higher. As expected, students motivated by résumé building motivations have a lower intensity of volunteering.
      Check with your library

      Engaging Millennial volunteers: understanding a new breed of volunteers
      McLay, Kathleen. Volunteering Queensland, 2016.
      This document addresses the key challenges for successfully engaging Millennials, how to develop an effective recruitment strategy and how to capitalise on the skills the Millennials have to offer. It also includes a guided approach to enabling change that will help with launching a Millennial volunteer program.
      Download the PDF: Engaging Millennial volunteers

      Millennials are drawn to companies that offer chances to volunteer.
      O’Neil, Megan. Chronicle of Philanthropy. 7/17/2014, Vol. 26 Issue 15, p14-14. 2/3p.
      The article discusses the June 2014 Millennial Impact Report of consulting firm Achieve which reveals that millennials, individuals aged 20 to 34, claim that their companies’ volunteer policies played a huge role in their decision to apply for a job. Topics mentioned include the positive outlook for millennials in terms of community service.
      Go to article or check with your library.

      Placing Youth in a Volunteer Framework
      Volunteering Auckland, Maryanne Wardlaw, 2014
      This publication looks at the relationship between youth and nonprofits from the organisational perspective, discovering the reasons why few organisation choose to accept youth volunteers, the challenges and prejudices, and proposing ways volunteer centres can equip organisations to overcome them.
      Download the PDF

      Volunteer connections : family volunteering : making it official
      Volunteer Canada, 2004.
      “When organizations actively include families in their pool of volunteers, great things can happen.”
      Read the article

      Volunteer connections: new strategies for involving youth
      Volunteer Canada, 2001.
      A volunteer program management manual designed to assist both professional administrators of volunteer resources as well as individuals who find themselves recruiting, managing, overseeing and supporting volunteers.
      Read the publication

      Volunteering to Learn
      Murdoch University, Curtin University, and others.
      University student volunteering is a practice adopted by universities to enhance student learning, yet little is known about the how and why of this learning. This project, “Volunteering to Learn: Enhancing learning in the student volunteering experience in Australian universities”, took place from 2013 – 2015. The project identified how universities, students and host organisations work together to enable successful outcomes for all parties.
      Good Practice Guides and Concept Guides have been developed from the project which identified three types of university student volunteers, four types of host organisations and eight models in operation across Australian universities. A Companion Guide has been developed to accompany the Good Practice and Concept Guides and to offer more information on some aspects of University Student Volunteering.
      View the resources

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